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A Vote For Manufacturing

A Vote For Manufacturing

Submitted by Ian T. Howcroft, President, Canadian Manufacturers & Exporter

There will be numerous provincial elections across the country this fall, including Ontario. CME is a non-partisan organization, but an unabashed advocate for manufacturing. CME takes the election period as another opportunity to raise the issues, concerns and benefits of manufacturing, hoping that all candidates will state where they stand and what they will do to support Ontario’s largest sector.
CME has written to all three leaders, and, in fact, all MPPs, to provide them with its key priorities that they would like to see addressed by whoever assumes power AFTER October 6th.

There will be numerous provincial elections across the country this fall, including Ontario. CME is a non-partisan organization, but an unabashed advocate for manufacturing. CME takes the election period as another opportunity to raise the issues, concerns and benefits of manufacturing, hoping that all candidates will state where they stand and what they will do to support Ontario’s largest sector.

CME has written to all three leaders, and, in fact, all MPPs, to provide them with its key priorities that they would like to see addressed by whoever assumes power AFTER October 6th. ove its competitive position as a preferred destination for investing, developing and designing new products, manufacturing, exporting, and creating new jobs”.

1. Ensure stable, competitively priced energy. CME supports the integration of renewable energy infrastructure within the Province’s energy grid. At the same time, government policy must reflect the economic realities faced by Ontario’s manufacturers and exporters. Energy costs in the province have risen dramatically in recent years, making it one of the most expensive locations in North America to operate. Electricity forecasts suggest further increases of 8–10 per cent over the next five years. Despite corporate conservation efforts, these costs make it increasingly difficult to remain competitive, attract investment and create jobs. While overall energy costs must be reduced, as an initial step, CME recommends the expansion of the alternate allocation for global adjustment.

2. Lower taxes on businesses investing in new products and technologies. CME fully supported the introduction of the HST, as it helps reduce the cost of doing business in the province; however, the process of phasing-in tax credit allowances must be expedited for the full positive economic benefits to be felt. Specifically, energy use tax credit restrictions introduced with the HST should be immediately eliminated for all sizes of companies.

3. Invest in people and skills to enhance productivity and innovation. The growth of our economy is dependent on innovation. And innovation is dependent on the abilities of our people. CME strongly believes that the apprenticeship tax credit should be extended, most notably to allow for on-the-job employee retraining and skills development, to help address the 300,000-skilledworker shortfall anticipated by 2020.

4. Streamline regulations and reduce compliance costs for government, business and consumers. Unnecessary and duplicative regulations add cost to production, restrict production mandates and require expensive oversight that ultimately costs consumers through the end price they pay for goods and services. The province must modernize regulation, eliminate duplication between jurisdictions and simplify compliance requirements. Regulations where there are overlapping provincial and federal jurisdictions—in areas such as emissions and chemicals management—should be targeted for full harmonization to national and international standards.

5. Expand infrastructure that supports the movement of people and goods. Ontario’s economy is an integral part of an international supply chain that relies on the efficient movement of people and goods to remain competitive. Industry has shifted from a local to global base, yet our infrastructure has not evolved with the demand. Most of the critical trade corridors upon which Ontario businesses rely to get their workforce, production parts, and finished goods to and from their facilities are generations old, and were built for a different reality. Ontario must focus on expanding its critical trade corridors, especially Highway 401, the QEW and the international crossings that connect our industry to the world.

“In order to secure Ontario’s economic future, these priorities must be central for all representatives in Ontario’s 40th Legislative Assembly. They are the very foundation of Canada’s new economy,” concluded Mr. Howcroft.

About CME – Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) is Canada’s leading trade and industry association, and the voice of manufacturing and global business in Canada. For more information, visit www.cme-mec.ca.